One look around the University of Ottawa campus is enough to see it is steeped in history. Architectural styles of different eras blend together and tell the story of all the people who have called this campus home and have transformed it, in unison with the University's heartbeat. Here's a quick overview of some of our halls to help you embrace your new campus and make it yours.

Click on a building to learn more about its history.

uOttawa building map
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Tabaret

Tabaret

Tabaret Hall, a symbol of the University of Ottawa, was named in honour of Joseph-Henri Tabaret, o.m.i., a builder of the University who led its transformation from the humble Bytown College into a university institution. Built in 1905, this Hall's imposing Greek columns have even inspired the university's logo. Tabaret Hall houses the university's central administration, as well as student services such as Admissions and Financial Services.

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Fauteux

Fauteux

Former Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada, Gérald Fauteux, who was also its Dean from 1953 to 1962, founded the University's Faculty of Law. Fauteux Hall was built in 1973 to house under one roof the formerly separated two sections of the Faculty of Law, Civil Law and Common Law, as well as the Law Library.

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Lamoureux

Lamoureux

This Hall was named after the founder and director of the École normale de l'Université, René Lamoureux, o.m.i.. Before being integrated into the Faculty of Education in 1969, the École normale was for a long time the only institution in Ontario offering primary-teacher training in French. Opened in 1978, Lamoureux Hall is home to the Faculty of Education, which until then had been housed in Hagen Hall, built for the École normale in 1931.

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100 Laurier

100 Laurier

Built in 1894, 100 Laurier is the oldest building on campus. Originally named Juniorat du Sacré-Coeur and dedicated to train young men aspiring to join the Order of the Oblates, the 100 Laurier was acquired by the University of Ottawa in 1970. This fortress-like building is now home to the Department of Visual Arts.

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Desmarais

Desmarais

The impressive Desmarais Hall was named after University of Ottawa alumni, Paul Guy Desmarais, a Franco-Ontarian businessman and philanthropist. Mr. Desmarais owes his success in business to the shrewd use of the friendly takeover technique to acquire healthy companies experiencing significant but temporary financial difficulties. The university chose his name for the Hall which houses the Telfer School of Management in recognition of a $15-million donation for its construction in 2007.

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Roger Guindon

Roger Guindon

Roger Guindon, o.m.i., was the last Oblate leader of the University. As Rector from 1964 to 1984, he led the institution into modernity, notably through his key role in obtaining funding for the construction of the health sciences complex that now bears his name. Although located off the main campus, Roger Guindon Hall was built in the best place possible for the Faculty of Medicine: at the heart of a hospital complex that includes the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario and the General Hospital.

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STEM Complex

STEM

This most recent of the campus buildings (2018) still carries a bit of history with Les Yeux, a work that was painted on the old building that used to be there and that was reproduced on the new building. The STEM (Science - Technology - Engineering - Mathematics) Complex hosts interdisciplinary research and teaching facilities that foster relationships between the Faculties of Science and Engineering, new ways of thinking, experiential learning and entrepreneurship.

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Montpetit Hall and the Minto Sports Complex

Minto

These two buildings are a must for people who want to play sports on campus. Montpetit Hall includes a training centre with cardiovascular equipment and free weights, a swimming pool, a martial-arts room, a dance studio and courts for badminton, basketball, volleyball and water ball. At the Minto sports complex, you will find a Health and Lifestyle Centre with various training facilities, two ice rinks, a multi-sport hall (Zumba, spinning, yoga, etc.) and squash, soccer and football fields.

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Learning Crossroads

Learning Crossroads

This new building attached to Lamoureux Hall is important for new professors to know about, as it houses the Teaching and Learning Support Service (TLS), which allows teachers to explore new teaching methods using state-of-the-art digital tools. CRX is entirely dedicated to active learning, innovative technology-assisted instruction and study areas. It is equipped with the most innovative equipment and bright and comfortable study rooms. A food court including a Tim Hortons, a Thaï Express and a Paramount is also worth a visit.

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Montpetit Hall and the Minto Sports Complex

Montpetit Hall and the Minto Sports Complex

These two buildings are a must for people who want to play sports on campus. Montpetit Hall includes a training centre with cardiovascular equipment and free weights, a swimming pool, a martial-arts room, a dance studio and courts for badminton, basketball, volleyball and water ball. At the Minto sports complex, you will find a Health and Lifestyle Centre with various training facilities, two ice rinks, a multi-sport hall (Zumba, spinning, yoga, etc.) and squash, soccer and football fields.

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Jock Turcot University Centre

Jock Turcot University Centre

In his single year as President of the Student Federation of the University of Ottawa (SFUO) (1964-1965), Francis James "Jock" Turcot laid the foundations for the SFUO's operations. His work has impacted the SFUO and oth er Canadian student movements for decades. Following the tragic death of the perfectly bilingual Turcot, a fund in his name was created for the construction of one of the projects that he had envisioned, the University Centre. This building serves as a gathering place and includes a virtually zero-waste cafeteria, an auditorium, a bookstore and conference rooms.

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Morisset Hall

Morisset Hall

When Auguste Morisset, o.m.i., was appointed Director of the University Library in 1934, a monumental task awaited him. At the time, the library contained only 30,000 volumes, in two rooms, and the staff was not trained. Hence, he took it upon himmself to study in the United States to learn how to build a solid university library, after which he founded the University's School of Library Science. Morisset Hall is used mainly for the social sciences and humanities library and for library administration.

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Hamelin Hall

Hamelin Hall

Marcel Hamelin, an accomplished administrator of the University, worked 50 years on campus and held the positions of Dean of the Faculty of Arts and President and Vice-Chancellor of the University. His tenure saw the modernization boom of the 1970s, which opened the University's doors to women and international students, as well as the erection of four important buildings. The Official Languages and Bilingualism Institute (OLBI) and several departments of the Faculty of Arts are housed in this Hall, which is connected to the Simard Hall by a three-storey walkway.

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Hagen Hall

Hagen Hall

Paul Hagen, an Australian-born biochemist who worked at Oxford, Yale, Harvard, Queens and the National Research Council of Canada before becoming Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies in 1968, gave his name to this building. As a pioneer in the design of graduate programs, he laid a solid foundation for the University's academic programs. Although it now houses the Office of the Vice-Provost, Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, Hagen Hall was built for the University of Ottawa's École normale in 1931 and bears the old University's coat of arms, which can be seen under the ivy above the door on the building's east side.

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Heritage houses

Heritage houses

Several heritage houses in Sandy Hill have been acquired and used by the University over the years. The houses on Séraphin-Marion Street, built between 1875 and 1885, have been carefully restored using archives photos and now house the Alex Trebek Graduate Pavilion and the Michaëlle Jean Foundation. The university also has a few houses on Stewart Street and several on King Edward Avenue, which are sometimes painted in garnet and grey, the colours of the University.

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Social Sciences Building

Social Sciences Building

Opened in 2012, this 15-storey building has obtained LEED Gold certification thanks to its six-storey green wall that filters air, its green roof, its very low energy consumption due to a heat redistribution system, and its recycled or local building materials. Together with Vanier Hall, it houses the entire Faculty of Social Sciences, as well as a brightly lit Première Moisson café on the ground floor.